EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS

Monday, October 25, 2021
Block 1 | 9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
 

Navigating the Job Market Without a Job: A Three-Case Conversation

Location: Trinity 3 | Track: Career | Target Audience: Student, Faculty, Staff

Based on research interviews with dozens of higher education administrators, this session will consider strategies for those who are currently unemployed and those who may unexpectedly become unemployed in the future. Specifically, case studies will guide discussions about navigating the job market without the benefit of a currently being employed and holding a job title. Although generally applicable to student affairs administrators, faculty serving in administrative roles will find this session applicable, too. In addition to a brief presentation, much of the time will include discussion. Time will also be allowed at the end for Q & A.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants in this session will leave with an understanding of challenges faced during unemployment in higher education administration, be able to articulate why job loss is potentially stigmatic or uncomfortable, and identify practical steps they can take when facing unemployment

Jeff Strietzel, Educational Leadership, Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow, Baylor University 


On the path to dismantling systemic barriers in order to meet the holistic needs of students.

Location: Pecos | Track: Campus | Target Audience: Student, Faculty, Staff

Just prior to the onset of the COVID-19 World Pandemic, Tarleton students responded on the National Collegiate Health Assessment III that 57.8% were experiencing low or very low food security. Seated within the larger state of Texas context The Hope Center’s 2021 report indicates that 43% of Texas college students have food insecurity and 55% have housing insecurity. With the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board’s goal of 60% of Texans ages 25-34 to obtain a postsecondary credential, we must redefine traditional definitions and practices related to student success.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will build upon The Hope Center’s research and data resources to inform their own campus’ context for informed action.
  • Participants will understand the need to disaggregate (deconstruct) data in order to best examine basic need insecurities on various identities.

Lora Helvie-Mason, Tarleton State University, Student Affairs, Assistant Vice President of Student Affairs
Elizabeth Wallace, Director of Assessment and Strategic Initiatives, Tarleton State University, Division of Student Affairs


Give Back to Impact: Latinx College Student Organization Involvement and Its Influence on Community Engagement by Former Members

Location: Rio Grande | Track: Community | Target Audience: Student, Faculty, Staff

A follow-up study to the author’s original 2017 study on the impact of Latinx student involvement was performed to understand reasons for Latinx community, civic, and artistic involvement.  In the original investigation, Latinx college student organization members were interviewed to reflect on the impact of their college involvement 20 years after college graduation. This study provides additional findings using participants from the original study to explain reasons for their community and civic involvement and how Latinx college student organizations instilled motivation for such activity.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Learn how LCSOs impact the motivation for community advocacy and involvement of Latinx college students after graduation.
  • Understand the variety of ways LCSO former members “give back to impact” in their communities.
  • Become aware of the collectivist nature of leadership found in LCSOs and how former members make sense of this leadership characteristic in their post-college careers and lives.

Ricardo Montelongo, Sam Houston State University, Educational Leadership, Associate Professor


Transitioning  from graduate student to new professional: Strategies for new professionals and supervisors

Location: San Jacinto | Track: Career | Target Audience: Student, Faculty, Staff

The transition from graduate school to a full-time role can be instrumental in shaping an individual’s career in student affairs. New professionals are challenged to learn a new position, and they are asked to identify support networks, navigate institutional culture, and for some establish a life in a new city. For the past two years, recent graduates participated in guided discussions as they transitioned into their new positions. In this interactive session, the presenters will discuss the success strategies used to navigate the transition.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will be able to describe challenges faced by new professionals transitioning from graduate school.
  • Supervisors will be able to design support strategies to utilize when assisting new professionals transitioning into a new role.
  • New professionals will be able to identify strategies to use when preparing for the transition into a new professional role.
  • Participants will be able to explain the benefits of guided reflection in a peer-to-peer setting during transition.

Krista Bailey, Texas A&M University, Educational Administration and Human Resource Development, Clinical Associate Professor
Teresa Wesolowski, Coordinator of Student Activities, Wayne State University
Bianca Z. Quiñones, Program Director of Hispanic-Latinx Affairs, University of Florida
Mehrangiz Abadi, Ph.D. Student, Texas A&M University


#TheFirstTimeISawMe - "The Spicy Latina"

Location: Sabine | Track: Community | Target Audience: Student, Faculty, Staff

The presentation will focus on two parts:

Part 1: Demographics and historical presence of trends of the Hispanic/Latin(o/a/x) community. We hope to answer the question of "what's the difference between Chicano, Latino/a/x and Hispanic?

Part 2: #TheFirstTimeISawMe. Representation in the media has had an increasing presence in our communities. We hope to create dialogue about diversity and representation in the media with a focus on the trope of the "Spicy Latina" and how that translates to building community in higher education.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will have the opportunity to:
  • Learn about the importance of the terms: Hispanic, Latino/a/x, Chicano and how preferences for identification vary by regions as well as national origin.
  • Learn about the trends in the population and the importance of these trends in building community in the field of higher education.
  • Understand that when stereotypes are repeated over time they can become accepted as reality or normalized.

Andrea Trevino, Program Manager II, University of Houston/Student Housing and Residential Life/Student Centers 
Sarah Flores, Assistant Director, University of Houston, Student Centers

Monday, October 25, 2021
Block 2 | 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
 

5 ‘F’s of Student Success

Location: Trinity 3 | Track: Campus | Target Audience: Student, Faculty, Staff

Student affairs professionals are all about helping students succeed in college. But some of us lack a simple way to talk about how students can be successful, or perhaps more pertinently, major factors that tend to “trip up” students. Participants in this session will engage a five-factor framework that highlights college student departure and the mirrored areas of focus for students’ success. After introductions and a brief literature overview, participants will learn the 5 ‘F’s Framework, join a discussion around how their own experiences align (or do not align) with the framework, and consider how the “the 5 ‘F’s” can inform student affairs practice in Texas. Discussion will be incorporated throughout the session, and time will be allowed at the end for Q & A.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants in this session will gain an understanding of five departure factors and the mirrored areas of focus for college student success
  • Participants in this session will gain identify practical ways to support students throughout their career using the 5 ‘F’s Framework

Jeff Strietzel, Baylor University, Educational Leadership, Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow
David Q. Hao, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs & Dean of Students, University of St. Thomas, Division of Student Affairs


Embedding a Culture of Care within the Title IX Process from Referral to Resolution

Location: Rio Grande | Track: Campus, Community | Target Audience: Faculty, Staff

Current and former Title IX administrators and student conduct officers will discuss developing, implementing, and assessing Title IX processes with a focus on trauma-informed practices and embedded a culture of care in the process. Participants will examine administrative law, case law, and legislation relating to Title IX compliance.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Attendees will learn tools and techniques for assessing their Title IX processes to promote a culture of care in the process.
  • Attendees will learn tools for implementing trauma-informed practices in the Title IX process.

Corey Benson, Dean of Students, The University of Texas Permian Basin
Iliana B. Melendez, Associate Dean of Students, University of Houston-Clear Lake
Dayna W. Ford, Director of Community Standards, University of Texas at Arlington
Martha Compton, Director of Client and Partner Relations at Grand River Solutions


Weaves and Boba Tea: Systemic Change Through Community Resources

Location: Sabine | Track: Campus, Community | Target Audience: Student, Faculty, Staff

Post-secondary education professionals are constantly seeking strategies to build and maintain a diverse student population i.e. students of color. Professionals examine internal concerns for recruitment and retention, but constant surveying must take place to acknowledge the location and space of an institution in relation to accessible external vendors and resources. Institutions are entities integrated within larger communities that must understand the availability of cultural and social resources in an area. This session will examine time, space and location of an institution in correspondence to student resources in an effort to properly assist various cultural and social identities on campus.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will evaluate recruitment and retention initiatives as it applies to their professional practice.
  • Participants will understand the importance of locating outside resources for students of various cultural backgrounds
  • Participants will identify their personal needs in order to be the most comfortable they can be in their professional role.

Amanda Handsbur, Austin College - Director of Student Activities
Christian Teague, Student Education Specialist, Texas Career Engagement - University of Texas at Austin


Preparing Students for the Workforce While Emphasizing Diversity Across the Curriculum: A Systematic Approach for Higher Education Practitioners

Location: Pecos | Track: Career | Target Audience: Student, Faculty, Staff

Through this interactive session, participants will discover additional ways to engage students through innovative in-classroom and virtual opportunities focused on diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). In addition to engaging students, innovative techniques to engage faculty and staff in DEI efforts will also be shared in this session.

Learning Outcomes:

  • By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to identify at least two DEI opportunities on their respective campuses.
  • By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to construct a DEI communication campaign for students, faculty, and staff.

Jennifer Edwards, Tarleton State University - Assistant Vice Provost for Academic Diversity Initiatives & Professor


Best Practices in Teaching Roundtable

Location: San Jacinto | Track: Community | Target Audience: Student, Faculty, Staff

Let’s talk about teaching! Whether you are a full-time faculty or teach a class as part of your role, join us to discuss best practices in teaching. Participants will have the opportunity to share strategies that they have found to be effective in a variety of teaching environments.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Identify best practices to use in teaching
  • Connect with colleagues from across Texas

Krista Bailey, Texas A&M University, Department of Educational Administration and Human Resource Development, Clinical Associate Professor
Peggy C. Holzweiss, Sam Houston State University, Department of Educational Leadership

Monday, October 25, 2021
Block 3 | 1:45 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
 

The Importance of Programs Like M.O.D

Location: San Jacinto | Track: Campus | Target Audience: Student, Faculty, Staff

How programs like M.O.D help male-identifying students stay retained in college, predominantly minority students from different ethnic and cultural backgrounds. This program is beneficial for student development and helps them on their journey through college. MOD helps male-identifying men grow a result using tactics focused on growth with meetings every week that get them around other students to talk about current events and introduce leadership tools they can use while in school.

Learning Outcomes:

  • The Importance of student organization and the effects it has on students and how programs like MOD helps many students
  • Help inform how programs need to incorporate these tools in other organizations to lead to more student success

Michael Rodgers, Multicultural Affairs


Connecting with the local community to advance DEI on campus

Location: Pecos | Track: Community | Target Audience: Staff

Like many institutions, in the wake of the murder of George Floyd, renewed awareness of social/economic inequities and #blackat__university campaigns, MSU Texas heard the call to action. The DEI (diversity, equity and inclusion) task force appointed by the University president reviewed data, listened to student voices and examined best practices to inform a new DEI Strategic Plan. Institutional change that is systemic and sustainable cannot occur in a vacuum; this session examines strategic actions/initiatives related to partnership and engagement with the local community. The presenter will share key tools and tactics, and participants will be encouraged to exchange best practices.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Increase their knowledge of methods to "create ongoing strategic plans for the continued development of inclusive initiatives and practices throughout the institution." (ACPA/NASPA Professional Competency - Social Justice and Inclusion, Advanced)
  • Identify new opportunities to use "provide consultation to other units, divisions, or institutions on strategies to dismantle systems of oppression, privilege, and power on campus," .

Cammie Dean, Assistant Vice President for Equity & Inclusion, Midwestern State University


2020: The Year of Staying Inside and Learning A Lot

Location: Trinity 3 | Track: Campus | Target Audience: Staff

During this program we will discuss how the University of Texas at Dallas managed the COVID-19 Pandemic whilst still providing the best service for their students. This program will touch on aspects from Residential Life, Housing Operations, Housing Administration, Living Learning Communities and the Dean of Students/Tracing Team. Everything from determining quarantine/isolation spaces on campus to revamping a residential curriculum to meet our virtual needs to vacillating weekly COVID testing for on-campus students and staff. Through collaboration and hard work, UTDallas was able to offer students a rewarding and engaging year despite it being a global pandemic.

Learning Outcomes:

  • By attending this program, participants will learn what the University of Texas at Dallas did to help the university and its students transition from in person to virtual.
  • By attending this program, participants will learn how the University of Texas at Dallas collaborated interdepartmentally to ensure students/staff were safe during the COVID pandemic.

Laura Glasgow, University of Texas at Dallas, Residential Life, Residential Life Coordinator
Louis Edwards, Residential Life Coordinator, University of Texas at Dallas, Residential Life


Administrator-to-Faculty Transitions: A Panel Discussion with Texas Faculty

Location: Rio Grande | Track: Career | Target Audience: Student, Faculty, Staff

Have you ever considered becoming adjunct or full-time faculty? This panel discussion features current and former administrators who transitioned into part-time or full-time faculty positions. The panel members will provide insights into faculty roles and responsibilities, discuss the benefits and challenges of being a faculty member, and share advice about how to prepare for a faculty role. The audience will have an opportunity to ask panel members questions following prepared remarks.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Articulate the challenges and benefits of faculty roles
  • Identify preparation strategies for a transition to faculty

Peggy Holzweiss, Sam Houston State University, Educational Leadership, Associate Professor
Kevin Bazner - Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi, Department of Educational Leadership
Jennifer Edwards - Full Professor of Communication & Executive Director for the Texas Social Media Research Institute, Tarleton State University
Jeff Strietzel - Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow, Leadership Studies, Baylor University, Department of Educational Leadership
Uyen Tran-Parsons – Higher Education Master’s Program Coordinator and Principal Lecturer, University of North Texas


Professional Development for Student Affairs Interns: Helping Summer Comets Soar

Location: Sabine | Track: Career | Target Audience: Staff

This session features discussion and data analysis of the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) summer intern professional development series established the summer of 2019. Through utilization of NASPA competencies as a framework, interns were afforded the opportunity for development outside their specific internship requirements. As many summer interns become the newest additions to the Student Affairs profession, proactive skill development becomes an essential component that many institutions may look to incorporate into their intern programs.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will gain a greater sense to the scope of development for Student Affairs summer interns. 
  • Participants will be able to identify areas of collaboration across different Student Affairs functional areas and institutions for the development of rising professionals. 
  • Participants will gain a better understanding of the applicability of NASPA competencies as it relates to professional development.

Laura Glasgow, University of Texas at Dallas

Monday, October 25, 2021
Block 4 | 4:15 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
 

Reimagining the Student Conduct Process to Ensure Equity and Examine Issues of Racial Injustice

Location: Trinity 3 | Track: Campus, Community | Target Audience: Faculty, Staff

As institutions work to increase access and equity for students from underrepresented backgrounds, student affairs practitioners must redouble their commitments to identifying and dismantling systemic inequalities. By evaluating the student conduct process to ensure equity and critically examine issues of racial injustice, student conduct practitioners can identify trends in referrals, findings, and sanctions on their campuses, and work toward more inclusive and developmental conduct processes.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Attendees will learn about tools and techniques for assessing their student conduct processes to promote equity through the process.
  • Attendees will learn tools for identifying systematic inequities in their student conduct processes and how to navigate reconstructing those process with campus partners.

Corey Benson, Dean of Students, The University of Texas Permian Basin
Iliana B. Melendez, Associate Dean of Students, University of Houston-Clear Lake
Dayna W. Ford, Director of Community Standards, The University of Texas at Arlington
Martha Compton, Director of Client and Partner Relations at Grand River Solutions


No pos ta’ cabrón: First Generation Students to First Generation professionals (FGS -> FGP)

Location: Pecos | Track: Campus, Community, Career | Target Audience: Student, Faculty, Staff

On the other side of comfort are the tremendous opportunities for success. This is true for students, as well as professionals. For first-generation students, the decision to leave their supportive, multicultural comfort-zones and transition to predominantly ‘majority’ institutions can be incredibly difficult. For first-generation professionals, the challenges with navigating the same higher education system can be equally daunting. This presentation, by Los Higher Ed Homies, will discuss the largest & fastest growing demographic in the US: the Latino/Hispanic community and our experiences as marginalized first-generation communities. The presentation will follow our paths from students to professionals, while sharing stories about the lessons learned as first-gens.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Graduation and retention rates of Latino/Hispanics;
  • Lessons learned from first generation students and professionals;
  • Ability for institutions to identify the needs of diverse student populations without assumptions.

Cesar Quezada, Student Services Coordinator- Multicultural Center at University of North Texas
Fred Fuentes, Executive Director, Latinx Outreach and Engagement, Texas A&M University-Commerce


Graduate Program Coordinator Roundtable

Location: San Jacinto | Track: Community | Target Audience: Faculty

Join other graduate program coordinators for a roundtable discussion. Current issues, challenges, and successes at both the master and doctoral level will be discussed and best practices will be shared. Participants will help to shape the agenda of the discussion.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Identify resources across the state of Texas within other graduate programs.
  • Describe best practices to address current issues and challenges within graduate programs.

Krista Bailey, Clinical Associate Professor, Texas A&M University, Educational Administration and Human Resource Development 
Peggy C. Holzweiss, Associate Professor, Sam Houston State University, Educational Leadership


Engaging Community: An Experience Implementing a Place-Based Community Engagement Initiative

Location: Sabine | Track: Community | Target Audience: Student, Faculty, Staff

Institutions of higher education are increasingly encouraged to incorporate high-impact educational practices into the curriculum. Southern Methodist University implemented a place-based community engagement program at their eleven residential colleges to meet exposed community needs and fulfill student graduation requirements. Come review this place-based community engagement initiative; learn the Engage Dallas initiative structure; understand built-in student learning measures; and discuss lessons learned in the first year of implementation.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Recall the five tenets place-based community engagement model
  • Summarize the Engage Dallas initiative structure
  • Analyze the built-in qualitative and quantitative student learning measures
  • Discuss lessons learned in the first year of implementation of a place-based community engagement model

Staphany López-Coronado, Assistant Director, Office of Social Change and Intercultural Engagement, Southern Methodist University
Dustin Grabsch, Director, Academic Initiatives, Southern Methodist University
Matt Nadler, Residential Community Director, Southern Methodist University
Madison Mucci-Ferris, Residential Community Director, Southern Methodist University


Thomas Moorman Fellowship Program Panel

Location: Rio Grande | Track: Career | Target Audience: Student

Are you interested in becoming a part of 2021-2022 Fellowship cohort? Thomas Moorman Fellowship Program provides intensive professional development experience, mentorship, and support to future leaders in the Association and the field of Student Affairs. Join the 2020-2021 Thomas Moorman Fellows as they share their journey and insights to each of their projects and experiences.

Rodolfo Gomez, Graduate Assistant for Student Money Management Center, University of North Texas
Steven Smith, Residence Director, Department of Housing and Residential Life, Texas State University
Trevor McCray, Career Consultant, Texas Woman's University
Reyna Flores, Senior Program Coordinator, The University of Texas at Austin
Lauren Loper, MSAP Grant Project Manager, IDEA Public School
Bianca Cerda, Academic Advisor, Texas A&M University

Texas Association of College and University Student Personnel Administrators
tacuspa@tacuspa.net

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software